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The good news (euangelion) of the crucified and risen Messiah was proclaimed first to Jews in Jerusalem, and then to Jews throughout the land of Israel. In Jerusalem Crucified, Jerusalem Risen, Mark Kinzer argues that this initial audience and geographical setting of the euangelion is integral to the eschatological content of the message itself. While the good news is universal in concern and cosmic in scope, it never loses its particular connection to the Jewish people, the city of Jerusalem, and the land of Israel. The crucified Messiah participates in the future exilic suffering of his people, and by his resurrection offers a pledge of Jerusalem’s coming redemption.
 

Basing his argument on a reading of the Acts of the Apostles and the Gospel of Luke, Kinzer proposes that the biblical message requires its interpreters to reflect theologically on the events of post-biblical history. In this context he considers the early emergence of Rabbinic Judaism and the much later phenomenon of Zionism, offering a theological perspective on these historical developments that is biblically-rooted, attentive to both Jewish and Christian tradition, and minimalist in the theological constraints it imposes on the just resolution of political conflict in the Middle East.

 

“Jerusalem Crucified, Jerusalem Risen is a careful but exciting reading of the NT through the lens of Luke-Acts . . . Kinzer shows that it is the principal link between the Gospels and the Epistles of the NT, and that it unveils the Jewish-gentile admixture of the early church in ways that answer fundamental questions about Christology, eschatology, ecclesiology, ethics, and missiology. Readers of this book will discover ways of seeing Jesus and the early church that will set all of Christian theology in a new light.”
--GERALD R. MCDERMOTT, Beeson Divinity School

Rabbi Dr. Mark Kinzer giving a lecture about "Jerusalem Crucified, Jerusalem Risen" at the Bram Center in Jerusalem, May 26, 2019.

“Kinzer’s work is ground breaking. He focuses especially on Luke and Acts to show that Jerusalem then, now, and in the future is central to the hope of the Jewish Messiah, Jesus—and thus to his ecclesial body, both Jew and gentile. The good news is geographical. Kinzer develops a new form of Christ-centered Zionism, eschewing millenarianism, and bloody battle scenarios. His work is changing and challenging theological maps for Jewish and gentile followers of Jesus.”
--GAVIN D’COSTA
University of Bristol

“This is a fascinating book. Kinzer makes the case that Israel is so central to the gospel message that removing her from it, and its hope, seriously dilutes what the gospel is about. With many fresh takes on passages, he opens up this issue for renewed discussion. It is a conversation well worth having.”
--DARRELL BOCK
Dallas Theological Seminary

In November 2017,

Rabbi Dr. Mark S. Kinzer spoke at 

"A New Vision for a New Generation," a Messianic Jewish Conference 

held at Congregation Ruach Israel in Needham, Massachusetts.

Session 1

  • Opening Lecture, Bilateral Ecclesiology & the History of Messianic Judaism: This lecture will introduce the series by describing the current period of transition in the Messianic Jewish movement, and urging the next generation of leaders to draw creatively upon the wisdom of the past as they address the challenges of the future. That wisdom includes bilateral ecclesiology. This lecture will define bilateral ecclesiology, set its emergence in the context of the history of the Messianic Jewish movement, and suggest that this insight has the potential to provide essential guidance for the future. 

 

Session 2

  • Bilateral Ecclesiology & the New Jewish Landscape: This lecture will look at some of the dramatic changes that are occurring in the Jewish world, and propose future directions for the Messianic Jewish movement that draw from the wisdom of bilateral ecclesiology and take account of those changes.

 

Session 3

  • Bilateral Ecclesiology & the New Christian Landscape: This lecture will look at some of the dramatic changes that are occurring in the Christian world, and propose future directions for the Messianic Jewish movement that draw from the wisdom of bilateral ecclesiology and take account of those changes.

 

Session 4

  • Bilateral Ecclesiology & the New Secular Landscape: This lecture will look at some of the dramatic changes that are occurring in secular society, and propose future directions for the Messianic Jewish movement that draw from the wisdom of bilateral ecclesiology and take account of those changes.

 

Session 5

  • Bilateral Ecclesiology & the Future of Messianic Judaism: This final session will summarize what has already been presented, and advance the discussion by describing several models of Messianic Jewish life that need further attention and development in the coming decades.

Mark Kinzer’s work has been foundational to the development of a theologically robust and responsible Messianic Judaism in the 21st century, a contribution that will lead to significant reverberations in the wider Jewish and Christian worlds. 

David Rudolph, author of A Jew to the Jews (Mohr Siebeck 2011) and editor of Introduction to Messianic Judaism (Zondervan 2013)

 

[Mark Kinzer is] a breakthrough thinker who has taken Messianic Judaism to a new level of theological sophistication.

Richard Mouw, former President of Fuller Theological Seminary

  

[Mark Kinzer is] widely regarded as the [Messianic Jewish] movement’s foremost theologian.

R. Kendall Soulen, Wesley Theological Seminary

 

As a Messianic Jewish theologian, Mark Kinzer now joins the ranks of David Stern, Daniel Juster, and earlier Hebrew Christians such as Jacob Jocz, Joesph Rabinowitz, and Paul Levertoff. Each in their time helped to shape the aims and aspirations of Jewish believers in Jesus, articulating their views in the context of Church and Synagogue.

Richard Harvey, Mishkan

 

Very perceptive in this field of Jewish-Christian relations are the pioneering books of the Messianic Jew Mark S. Kinzer.

Henk Bakker, Faculty of Theology, VU University Amsterdam

 

I have come to recognize Mark Kinzer as a major theologian whose work deserves serious attention in the Catholic world.

Christoph Cardinal Schönborn, Archbishop of Vienna, Austria

 

MY BOOKS
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© 2017 by Mark S. Kinzer.

Scrutant son propre mystère

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